Hirschmann keeps sabbath

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Raleigh Goldinger, cub writer

Beverly’s brand new baseball coach, Ross Hirschmann, is very different from his peers. While many in today’s society have drifted away from their faith, Hirschmann has kept his religion.

Born in northern California Hirschmann grew up in Walnut Creek, a suburb of the San Francisco Bay Area.  Hirschmann went to college at UCLA and graduated law school from the University of California Hastings College of Law.

Hirschmann keeps the Jewish sabbath every weekend. When the Norman baseball team has games Friday through Saturday evenings, Hirschmann does not attend a substitute coach fills his place. Keeping the sabbath can mean going to temple or just being at home keeping the rules of shabbat. The sabbath means “the day of rest” where Jews can not drive, work or use electricity.

“Keeping the sabbath feels great because you completely disconnect from the everyday, mundane world and spend time connecting with what’s really important in life:  God and your family,”  Hirschmann said.

Keeping the sabbath can mean going to temple or just being at home keeping the rules of shabbat. The sabbath means “the day of rest” where Jews can not drive, work or use electricity.

“Since you cannot use electricity on the sabbath, you have the added advantage having to disconnect from your iPhone and all other electronic gadgets that seem so important to us all,” Hirschmann added

The shabbas allows Hirschmann to connect with what is important to him.

“Disconnecting from all of the technology and everything else that we’re occupied with during the week is very freeing and gives you great clarity about what’s truly important in life God and your family,” Hirschmann said.

 

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