How propositions affect Beverly Hills

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Sam Bernstein managing editor

Jude Binkley staff writer

Ava Seccuro staff writer

On Tuesday night, California voters decided on 11 propositions that will affect the lives of millions of Californians. Out of the 11 ballot measures, six were passed and five were rejected. This spread intends to inform readers about how these measures, regardless if they were passed or rejected, affect the city of Beverly Hills.

Proposition 1: Bonds to Fund Veteran & Affordable Housing

Was it passed?

Yes, by a 54.1 percent majority.

What does this mean for Beverly Hills?

The passing of this bill approves a $4 billion increase in bond money to fund housing assistance programs for low-income citizens, veterans and farmworkers. It is unlikely that low-income housing will be built in Beverly Hills.

What happens next?

This proposition likely will not result in any new construction in Beverly Hills. Construction on new low-income housing should begin in the next few years.

Proposition 2: Amend Existing Housing Program for Mental Illness

Was it passed?

Yes, by a 61.1 percent majority.

What does this mean for Beverly Hills?

It authorizes for bond money approved through Proposition 63 to be spent on an existing initiative to create more housing for mentally ill citizens. Prop. 63, which was passed in the 2004 election, added an extra 1 percent tax on incomes above $1 million to fund mental health programs. Again, unlikely that low-income housing will ever be built in Beverly Hills.

What happens next?

Like Proposition 1, it unlikely that there will be any government housing in Beverly Hills. The state will begin constructing new housing for the mentally ill.

Proposition 3: Bond for Water and Environmental Projects

Was it passed?

No, by a 52.3 percent majority.

What does this mean for Beverly Hills?

For the third time in four years, voters were asked to pass a water bond, and it failed. The rejection of Prop. 3 prevents the state from issuing roughly $8.9 billion in bond money to put in ‘water infrastructure, groundwater supplies and storage, surface water storage, and dam repairs.’ Money from this bill would have mostly gone to improving water infrastructure in central California. Because Beverly Hills receives water from Central CA, Beverly Hills would have received benefits from P

What happens next?

California voters have passed two water bonds since 2014 worth $11.5 billion, $750 million of which is going to improving the Friant-Kern Canal, which runs from Fresno to Bakersfield.

Proposition 4: Bond for Children’s Hospital Construction

Was it passed?

Yes, by a 60.6 percent majority.

What does this mean for Beverly Hills?

The approval of this bill issues $1.4 billion in bond money to the construction and refurbishing of children’s hospitals across the state. Hospitals close to Beverly Hills will receive aid from this bill. Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles be given $135 million in aid, and Mattel Children’s Hospital at UCLA will collect $54 million in aid. It is estimated that the bond would cost taxpayers $2.9 billion over the next 35 years.

What happens next?

Hospitals affected in the bill will receive their aid money in the coming years.

Proposition 5: Senior Property Reduction

Was it passed?

No, by a 58.1 percent majority.

What does this mean for Beverly Hills?

With this rejection, citizens older than 55  will only be able to transfer their tax assessments from their old home to new home if their new home is of equal or lesser value. They are can only do this once in their life.

What happens next?

The California Association of Realtors argue that this decentives the elderly from downsizing their homes, especially in areas with higher property value like Beverly Hills.

Proposition 6: Repeal of Fuel Tax Approved by Voters

Was it passed?

No, by a 55.1 percent majority.

What does this mean for Beverly Hills?

This proposition failing means the 2017 gas tax increase of 12 cents per gallon will remain in effect, as well as an increased vehicle registration fee.

What happens next?

The approximate $52 billion this tax will bring in the next decade will go towards transportation projects.

Proposition 7: Change Daylight Saving Time Period

Was it passed?

Yes, by a 59.9 percent majority.

What does this mean for Beverly Hills?

With the passing of this proposition, the first step was taken to get rid of daylight savings in California, if the measure were to pass in the state and federal government then people would no longer have to change their clocks twice a year.

What happens next?

The measure will now require a two-thirds vote from the California legislature and a change in the federal law to take effect.

Proposition 8: Regulates Kidney Dialysis Treatment Charges

Was it passed?

No, by a 61.6 percent majority.

What does this mean for Beverly Hills?

This proposition was shot down so the two dialysis clinics in Beverly Hills will not be required to refund patients ‘any revenue above 115% of the cost of direct patient care and healthcare improvements’.  

What happens next?

DaVita, one of the largest medical care centers that has a center in Beverly Hills, will not not be pushed to become unionized with other dialysis centers.

Proposition 9: Three States Initiative

On July 18, 2018, Proposition 9, which would make possible the future petitioning in Congress to divide the state of California into three states: California, Northern California, and Southern California, was removed from the ballot by order of the California Supreme Court because questions were raised regarding the validity of the proposition and the potential harm in including the measure in this election’s ballot.

Proposition 10: Rental Control on Residential Property

Was it passed?

No, by a 61.7 percent majority.

What does this mean for Beverly Hills?

State law continues to limit rent control laws for the city. Landlords in Beverly Hills cannot add new fees along with original rent, nor can rent control laws regulate single-family homes by means of home eviction.

What happens next?

Since Prop 10 did not pass, nothing new will happen.

Proposition 11: Emergency Ambulance Employees on-call

Was it passed?

Yes, by a 59.4 percent majority.

What does this mean for Beverly Hills?

Private ambulance companies will continue to have EMTs and paramedics stay on duty during their breaks in order to respond to 911 calls. Paramedics will NOT be subjected to labor laws nor will their breaks be uninterrupted. 911 calls will interrupt breaks, however, breaks will be rescheduled and in the event of such.

What happens next?

Anyone in the community in need of medical assistance will continue to receive it at the same rate as before since paramedics are still on duty during breaks.

Proposition 12: Farm Animals Confinement Standards

Was it passed?

Yes, by a 61 percent majority.

What does this mean for Beverly Hills?

Certain California farming/consumer businesses will be banned from selling uncooked eggs, pork or veal that was sourced from an organization that did not comply to the minimum animal housing requirements implemented by this proposition. There is a chance that select products in the near future will no longer appear in grocery stores in Beverly Hills due to potential failure to adhere to the requirements of “product” housing.

What happens next?

The state will spend up to $10 million a year to enforce this proposition. Implementation coincides with a potential decrease in state income tax revenues from farm businesses. As consumer products will be inspected, tested or analyzed, the community will receive notice of any products’ removal from the market.

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